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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to report that we have not released anyone until tonight, greta. first, there has been a report from the u.n. mission, iran's u.n. ambassadors basically to the human rights council, that they've asked for a review of the case and retrial, maybe look at the facts. and good news in light of the information that we've confirmed this afternoon, saeed was able to get doctors today to do a review of his internal bleeding. we've been concerned about. his health has been bad and got the review by doctors today and told he'll be moved to a hospital outside evan prison. now, it's our turn to pressure iran with this information to make sure that we try as much as possible to hold them to their word. >> greta: naghmeh, i imagine you're-- happy is not quite the word, but relieved he's going to be moved to a hospital maybe. do you have any sense of confidence that that will really happen or do you think that may just be the iranians saying this passing for one day? >> as he mentionedo continue to put pressure to hold them to their word. they've made many promises they haven't followed through with. i'm ho
-type force. he is going to the u.n. he is looking for the french to take a lot of the lead. he is going to be -- but nobody, even with both syria and with iran, there is no nobody particularly at the pentagon who is really wanting to do this right now. and barack obama least of all. chris: michael. >> chris, this poses problems, the perception which i think is accurate of our wearyness causes problems particularly in iran. people don't believe that this president really is willing to follow through on the use of force because they think that his head is still looking back at iraq. someone who spoke to him recently told me a few days ago that he has said about syria, words to the effect of "i know how i get in. tell me how i get out. i don't know how to get out." he is still thinking of what we got into unexpectedly in iraq, the unintended consequences of american action. it's a defining thing for him. chris: a sense of wisdom. let me ask you about this column. in terms of republican politics, and speak for that if you can, that they know that george w bush is basically identified comple
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
in the u.n. or the international criminal court. >> we'll see whacomes out. and then john kerry is going to follow up on this. but i suspect that from the way that the wording is coming out there may be a softening of positions on both sides on this in terms of settlement. a restraining settlement activity. >> rose: and palestinian initiatives in the u.n.. >> right. >> rose: okay. the last one is empower secretary of state kerry. >> he hasn't done that yet. he really needs to do it because he's given this speech which has raised expectations sky-high about what the united states is going to do in the peace process. and if he doesn't back kerry up, because kerry is the one that is going to be doing it, kerry won't be able to succeed. >> my guess is knowing secretary kerry and knowing secretary clinton, that secretary kerry will give this because he passionately is interested in this more tension, individually on his own, than secretary clinton. >> he says it that the time, sorry, that the time for middlest envoy is over. >> he is a secretary that is widely prceived as being verylose to th
commission. and the country is better off for it. on the 17 u.n. resolutions in front of -- they were questioning saddam hussein. on the last resolution, it was a vote of 15-0 in the national security council. russia, china and syria voted. it wasn't as if it was a republican idea. the world thought saddam hussein -- >> greg: you can't get that -- >> dana: you can't get that cooperation now. >> greg: what do you think, eric? >> eric: let's talk about what happened. remember that saddam hussein aligned his troops. he took the border of kuwait and he was going to kuwait. not speculation if he was a bad guy. he was a bad guy. he didn't go to kuwait. he lined them up and we did desert storm and stopped them. he lit the kuwaiti oil field on fire but didn't go to kuwait to take the country down. he decided to light the oil fields on fire. we had to take saddam hussein out. we had been punched in the face with 9/11. afghanistan war was starting up. we had to do what we did. it's the smartest thing george bush did. restored confidence in america. >> dana: one other point. a tease. quad gaddaf
where the president stood at the u.n. where he advocated to not recognize palestine as an independent state there is room for grievance. let me ask you, jane where is there room for hope? >> well, americans i think we really are the people who bring hope to a region who are locked in this. i agree that the continued settlement growth is a tremendous obstacle. i think it makes life difficult for the palestinians, and i think it makes life difficult for the israelis in terms of what it does to the israeli soul. but i do think that people much smarter in geography than i am have figured out in fact, it is possible still maybe the window is closing but it is possible to carve out a viable palestine state that will require a lot of resettlement by israelis unless they want to live there, and one hopes that just as 20% of israelis are arabs, there might be jews who would be willing with regard to a new palestinian state. however, that window is closing no doubt about it with the rate that the bitter rates are happening and settlement growth is occurring there is an urgency now upon the lead
colin powell made that infamous just outlandish presentation to the u.n., four washington post-columnists cheered him saying there's no debate anymore. sadaam hussein has to be taken out. mainstream media was by far probably the worst failure of the last half century. >> war always good for ratings. i'd like to ask you about what the organization of women's freedom in iraq entails answered what are your thoughts today on this 10 year anniversary? i remember in 2003 when i decided to go back home, and the idea was that this war cannot bring anything good to iraq. you cannot bring anything good by bombing and killing. it's an arsenal of killing that was sent to the other side of the world. women cannot benefit from that. and besides we had the feeling that creating the vacuum in iraq would bring in the bad influences of the region, with some of them that come from saudi arabia, some from iran and that cannot be good for iraqi women. in the previous regime time, which was under a dictatorship, but still women were able to be educated, go to work and i'm an example of that. i was a
. if the u.s. provides $3 billion to israel and it's vetoed out of the u.n. security council this it's unwilling to take us to the finish line and i think we need to internationalize this issue. that's the palestinian responsibility to international jaz it. there's clear support in the u.n. general assembly to do more and better than the u.s. has been able to do. >> again one of the reasons i was so pleased with what we saw with what president obama said and with what the world hear president obama say he severely explained this is what the united states policy is. it begins with israeli children and palestinian children. deserve a better future. how we going give to it them. second the way to do that is two states side-by-side and then third the way to get to two states is the through direct negotiations. you may not agree with that third step. i hope people will. but the fact is we start with what's the best way to achieve what israeli and palestinian parents want for their children and one another. >> is that perfect example of the dual role. the position of direct negotiations is
resolution that gets voted on at the u.n. as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that you, that we were discussing. we went to paris, we went to paris, egypt and then tunis. and it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, you know, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want, or we can actually try to shape this into something that is going to deliver people. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it's might be the most, i think, historical. >> guest: yes. i love that chapter. >> host: and just talk about what made that trip so unique. obviously, not very many people are traveling to burma at least from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more, but certainly at the time it was very, very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to, um, when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers, this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my persona
to protect civilians. that's the final resolution that gets voted on at the u.n., as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that we were discussing, we went to paris. we went to paris, egypt and into this. it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want or we can try to shape us into something that is going to deliver. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it might be the most historical. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique. obvious that not very many people have gone to burma. >> guest: more and more of a string of the time it was very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, no, my book will do for readers. is this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and
't yet reached the red line that i had described in my speech at the u.n. they are getting closer, though. and the question of manufacturing a weapon is a different thing. the president said correctly that we have on these issues, a little arcane. but on these matters, we share information and we have a common assessment. we have a common assessment. in many case, iran gets to an immunity zone when they get through the enrichment process, in our view. in our view. and what ever time is left, there's an lot of time. and everyday that passes, it diminishes it. but we do have a common assessment on these schedules, on intelligence, we share that intelligence. and we don't have any argument about it. i thinki it's important to stat that clearly. i think that people should get to know president obama the way i've gotten to know him. and i think you've just heard something that is very meaningful. it may have escaped you. but it hasn't escaped me. that is the president announced that in addition to all of the aid that his administration has provided, including iron dome, including defense fundi
the u.n. general assembly, an american secret service agent accidently discharged the shotgun in the direction of the iranian leader as he was getting into his motorcade in new york. the close call, quote, scared the hell out of u.s. officials who would worried ahmadinejad might use it against them. he never mentioned it again. mysterious. >>> ahead in our money lead without my dedicated twitter followers what would i do with my day? maybe accomplish something. it's twitter's birthday, my tweets. to celebrate i sit down with the hacker turned ceo behind it all. >>> plus, our pop lead. word on the street is that the suits at nbc are showing jay leno the exit. what does abc's jimmy kimmel thing about the soon-to-be out of work comedian? >> i do think he's capable. i've seen him. i mean, listen. the guy is one of the great comedians. >> you think he's dumbed down his material? >> yeah, i think so. that's fair to say. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day..
look good for a press release to be able to say you're getting some progress in the u.n. but the only way we're going to be able to achieve that two-state solution is through direct negotiations. >> abbas has also threatened to report israel to the international criminal court for human rights violations. do you think that overall that this trip is really a lot about sort of managing relationships more than solving problems? >> well, i think the relationships are extremely important. if the palestinians went to the international criminal court, that would set back, i think, the prospects for peace and the two-state solution. i think the president will make that clear. but i do think establishing the personal relationships, talking to the people, very important. the united states will play a critical role and those personal relationships could take you a long way. >> senator ben cardin, always good to see you. thank you for coming on the program. matt, do you have a sense of what the white house would consider a successful trip? >> that's an interesting question. i think if he gets goo
quickly it will not be automobile to be detected by u.n. weapons inspectors and u.s. intelligence service that. is real concern that is the issue prime minister netanyahu and president obama have to agree. uma: on issue of syria, chemical weapons, what are the thoughts at this moment? is there viable evidence to say those weapons have actually been used? >> certainly those are the claims and i think there will be a u.n. investigation into this but that clearly has been a red line president obama has drawn and needs to draw and it will be very critical that if there are chemical weapons being used by the assad regime president obama responds accordingly. that is another red line he is drawing. that is red line irisraelies will be watching and iranians. is this president serious about committing to red lines and honoring the red lines. uma: quickly with obama speaking to young people in israel, that was very interesting strategy on his part because he knows he often does well in those kind of settings, at that type of theater backdrop. >> i think that's right. president obama shown in the u
are not seeing any of it the way the u.n. rules work. as long as the u.n. is recognizing the assad government that aid is not allowed to go into opposition territory which is where most of the refugees are so a whole calderon of issues. >> changing topics just a bit. some things only happen every four years, presidential elections and olympics and leap years. this weekend the senate did something it hadn't done in more than 1,400 days. they actually passed a budget. the all-night session stretched from thursday night to saturday. keystone lpipeline. they did pass the budget although by a margin of just one vote. >> the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average 35 amendments, we have done 70, twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> i know everyone is exhausted and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> not a single republican supported the plan. one of the finest days in the history of the senate. four democrat
the fear of god into the iranians. >> megyn: what does it mean for us? when netanyahu went before the u.n. and held up that bomb and drew a red line. what he's saying in this clip, we could reach the point of no return in iran, with its nuclear efforts by spring or summer of 2013. 2013, we're there, ralph, we're this. we're in the spring of 2013. so if we really have given him the green light and he does believe the point of no return is likely spring or summer of 2013, what does the horizon hold? >> well, nothing good. now, prime minister netanyahu was talking how it might take iran out to a year to develop a bomb. so the time line shall the goal postses are shifting on this one, but nonetheless i stick by my longstanding view that for israel to do it alone is a mistake. if this absolutely must be done, and i would regret it, but if it must be be done, it's better for the united states to hit iran, only we have the power not only smash the iranian nuclear program in itself, but to prevent iran's retaliation, to do that you have to take out air defense, intelligence, revolutionary guard.
and palestinians and palestinians snubbed the white house when they went to the u.n. to get recognition against the united states' wishes because that was a point of negotiation. i applaud the white house for going to israel and not trying to push a peace deal top down from the united states giving their orders about how this is going to happen and try to let this happen organically between the two parties. i'm not a critic of the president on his trip to israel. it was at least appreciated. >> i thought it was interesting about this is tone and tenor from the president. what hard work it would be. you don't begin the peace process with results. you have negotiations. it's almost as if he really was using where they aren't to try to start the thing again. >> i think that's right. i actually agree with amy. i think it's very smart of him to talk about israel's priorities and where the end game should be and really focus on trying to get people to the table and i thought what was so interesting was this last speech he gave to israeli university students where he basically focused on where he know
. the u.s. did nothing. the u.n. did nothing. the mayor, the council and citizens of los angeles did that. and it looks very different. new york it's not the port. in new york it's also not transportation. compared to place like phoenix and san diego use car the way they do in the west. but here the bulk of carbon emissions come from buildings poorly insulated, old, darkrooms, tar room, attracting the sub. so here mayor bloomberg niche initiated a crucial round of trying to get better insulation in old buildings, better insulated new buildings more efficient air conditioning, heating with change the six from four, to two, maybe to alternative energy. paint the rooms white. again, by local municipal laws and cooperative action and private-public partnership. you can begin to actually make an sphwhaict is measurable in the course of a year. that states simply haven't and can't do. and then you find these cities coming together in the c40 in other global environmental intercity organizations exchanging best practicing and you find what new york and l.a. have done can be replicated in other p
the planes are delivering humanitarian aid but the u.n. wants them stop for inspections in iraq before they continue to syria, and some see this is part of an american failure to suspectfully confront iran. >> fundamentally this is not a syria problem. this is an iran problem. what has impeded the administration's policy for the last two years since the conflict in syria began is an unwillingness to take on iran. that's the source of the trouble. that's where the key support for the assad regime comes from. >> there is no immediate indicate iraq will crackdown on the iranian flights. >>heather: steve, thank you from washington, dc. >> syria's western-backed opposition is reportedly in disarray after the president resigned early today in a surprise announcement saying he was frustrated with the international community and the opposition body itself. analysts say the chaos threatens to undermine the group's bid to unite forces against president assad and could also hamper support from the united states and other countries. >>heather: despite death threats, former pakistani president is b
before the u.n. general assembly and saying, look, they've got all the parts and pieces they need to build weapons of mass destruction. how much more skeptical was the press supposed to be? >> well, you are setting up the bush administration's case for war in iraq. and the united states went to war in iraq. congress supported the president's policy on going to war, and the media supported it what this all adds up to, however, since it didn't work out that way, was that somebody got it drastically wrong. american intelligence got it wrong, the brits got it wrong, the israelis got it wrong, everybody did which means somebody in our society -- and it ends up being the media -- has to stand up and say let's think about this a little bit rather than rush into a war. we are now at a point, jon, where an american president can determine when the united states goes to war, whether the congress approves of it or not. we don't deal with deck la rightses -- declarations of war any longer. and so at this particular point, who other than the media ought to stand up and say, wait a minute, let'
the situation inside of syria. there are measures we have called for, and we know the u.n. is moving forward with investigations on exactly what happened. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective. because, once you let that's the situation spend out of control, it is very hard to stop and that will have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so, we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody across the region and do everything we can to break -- bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out from under a leader who was lost all legitimacy because he is willing to slaughter his own people. he will be replaced. it is not a question of if. it is when. part of what we have to think about is what is the aftermath going to affect? and by the way, we need to think about that in a way that erves the syrian people from ll walks of life, from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know about this region is that if we fail the -- to create a model in the arab w
. starts with freshly-made pasta, and 100% real cheddar cheese. but what makes stouffer's mac n' cheese best of all. that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. made with care for you or your family. >> brian: today marks ten years since the u.s. invasion of iraq. while many have debated the merits of the war, no one can debate where our military stands now. look at the massive budget cuts. but our next guest says we're cutting humanitarian missions and that's going into the pentagon budget and delusional to think we'll have the same fighting force. mallory is the author of this book. what's in the defense budget that you think will upset some people? >> bench budget is loaded with all sorts of stuff. nation building, disaster relief, humanitarian aid. >> brian: hasn't it always been there? >> it's gotten bigger and bigger. we ask our defense department to do all sorts -- our men and women under arms, they'll do whatever we ask them to do. but we ask them to do things that are not really war fighting. our war fighting capabilities are only part of the defense budget. and more and more
doesn't work the way it used to. pastpa my prime? i'm a victim of a slowing metabolism? i doi n't think so. new grw eat grains protein blend. proteiotn from natural ingredients like skeeeds and nuts. it hitelps support a healthy metabolism. new greagrt grains protein blend. >> ♪ >> 714 on the clock was in an update on the forecast. five today but there are changes on the red erica. >> nothing to worry about today in fact a great start to the date. rain is on the way tuesday night in to wednesday. i walk you to the timing in just a minute. if you are heading for work or school of the '40's for san francisco. mid '40's in concord. future cast 4 highlights lunch. we will start to warm things up. upper 60s and the livermore valley along the delta, and portions of the south bay. it will be on the chilly side. temperatures climbing to the upper 50s coesite. >> your afternoon highs 2:00 p.m. the yellow starts to filling in. we could very well climb into the low seventies. by 8:00 p.m. tonight increase in cloud cover the clouds will starts to thicken up in advance of the storm system. >> temp
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)